World Hepatitis Day essay

World Hepatitis Day – 28 July
World Hepatitis Day Learn more about how viral hepatitis affects millions of people worldwide.

28 July is World Hepatitis Day

World Hepatitis Day essay : World Hepatitis Day, 28 July, an opportunity to advance national and international efforts on hepatitis, encourage action and engagement by individuals, partners and the public, and highlight the need for a more global response as outlined in WHO’s 2017 Global Hepatitis Report is. .

The date July 28 was chosen because it is the birthday of Dr. Baruch Blumberg, the Nobel Prize-winning scientist who discovered the hepatitis B virus (HBV) and developed a diagnostic test and vaccine for the virus.

Low coverage of testing and treatment is the most important gap in achieving the global eradication goals by 2030.

World Hepatitis Day essay

World Hepatitis Day is observed annually on 28 July to mark the birthday of Dr. Baruch Blumberg (1925–2011). Dr. Blumberg discovered the hepatitis B virus in 1967, and 2 years later he developed the first hepatitis B vaccine. These achievements culminated in Dr. Blumberg winning the Nobel Prize. Organizations around the world, including the WHO and CDC, celebrate World Hepatitis Day to raise awareness of the problem of viral hepatitis, which affects more than 325 million people worldwide.

This creates an opportunity to educate people about the burden of these infections, CDC’s efforts to combat viral hepatitis around the world, and the steps people can take to prevent these infections.

Viral hepatitis – a group of infectious diseases known as hepatitis A, B, C, D and E – affect millions of people worldwide, causing both acute (short-term) and chronic (long-term) liver disease. . Viral hepatitis causes more than one million deaths each year. While deaths from tuberculosis and HIV have declined, deaths from hepatitis are increasing.

What is CDC doing to help combat hepatitis globally?

Dr. Muazzam Nasrullah, Medical Officer, visiting a site in the urban slums of Islamabad, Pakistan
Three people walking on the road with two police escorts.
CDC’s vision is to eliminate viral hepatitis in the United States and globally. When resources allow, CDC collaborates with international partners to help prevent and control viral hepatitis in countries experiencing high rates of infection.

For example, to reduce the burden of hepatitis B infection, CDC provides financial and technical support for vaccination programs within high-burden countries, such as the Solomon Islands, the Philippines, Vietnam, Myanmar, Cambodia, Sierra Leone, the Pacific Islands, Laos, and HaitiExternal Icon. Supported activities include:

Implementing innovative interventions to increase the coverage of hepatitis B vaccine at birth;
Documenting the burden of hepatitis B in children; and
To support regions and countries in affirming the achievement of hepatitis B control and eradication goals.

To further reduce the burden of all types of viral hepatitis, CDC helps countries develop policies for surveillance, testing, care, and treatment, and assists in the development and implementation of national control and eradication programs. is. Countries that the CDC has recently endorsed include Pakistan, China and Georgia. Recently, CDC began working with Uzbekistan as they implement a pilot program to eliminate hepatitis B and C using an innovative funding model that could potentially lead to similar initiatives in countries with limited resources. can support.

This international work by CDC helps identify best practices that can serve as models for other countries, including the United States. CDC’s international work helps reduce the burden of disease globally, reduce risks for foreign travelers, and improve the health of people immigrating to the United States.

What are the different types of hepatitis that occur around the world?

Logo for World Hepatitis Day – 28 July 2021

The five hepatitis viruses – A, B, C, D and E – are different and can spread in different ways, affect different populations, and result in different health outcomes.

Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A is a vaccine-preventable liver infection caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). HAV is found in the feces and blood of infected people. Hepatitis A is very contagious. It is spread when someone unknowingly spreads the virus – even in microscopic amounts – through close personal contact with an infected person or by eating contaminated food or drink. Symptoms of hepatitis A can last up to 2 months and include fatigue, nausea, abdominal pain and jaundice. Most people with hepatitis A do not have a long-lasting disease. The best way to prevent hepatitis A is to get vaccinated.

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a vaccine-preventable liver infection caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Hepatitis B is spread when blood, semen, or other body fluids from a person infected with the virus enter the body of someone who is not infected. This can happen through sexual contact; sharing needles, syringes, or other medicine-injection equipment; or from mother to child at birth. Not everyone infected with HBV has symptoms, but those who do may include fatigue, loss of appetite, abdominal pain, nausea, and jaundice. For many people, hepatitis B is a short-term illness.

For others, it can become a long-term, chronic infection that can lead to serious, even life-threatening health problems, such as cirrhosis or liver cancer. The risk of chronic infection is related to the age of infection: approximately 90% of infants with hepatitis B develop chronic infection, while only 2%–6% of those who acquire hepatitis B as adults become chronically infected. . The best way to prevent hepatitis B is to get vaccinated.

Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C is a liver infection caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Hepatitis C is spread through contact with the blood of an infected person. Today, most people become infected with the hepatitis C virus by sharing needles or other equipment used to prepare and inject drugs. For some people, hepatitis C is a short-term illness, but for more than half of people who become infected with the hepatitis C virus, it becomes a long-term, chronic infection. Chronic hepatitis C can lead to serious, even life-threatening health problems such as cirrhosis and liver cancer.

People with chronic hepatitis C often have no symptoms and do not feel sick. When symptoms do appear, they are often a sign of advanced liver disease. There is no vaccine for hepatitis C. The best way to prevent hepatitis C is to avoid behaviors that can spread the disease, especially injecting drugs. It is important to get tested for hepatitis C, as most people with hepatitis C can be cured in 8 to 12 weeks with treatment.

Hepatitis D

Hepatitis D, also known as “delta hepatitis”, is a liver infection caused by the hepatitis D virus (HDV). Hepatitis D only occurs in people who are also infected with the hepatitis B virus. Hepatitis D is spread when the blood or other body fluids of a person infected with the virus enter the body of someone who is not infected.

Hepatitis D can be an acute, short-term infection or it can become a long-term, chronic infection. Hepatitis D can cause severe symptoms and severe illness that can lead to life-long liver damage and even death. People can be infected with both hepatitis B and hepatitis D viruses at the same time (known as “coincidence”) or hepatitis B virus (known as “superinfection”) after being previously infected. can get d. There is no vaccine to prevent hepatitis D. However, prevention of hepatitis B with the hepatitis B vaccine also protects against future hepatitis D infection.

Hepatitis E

Hepatitis E is a liver infection caused by the hepatitis E virus (HEV). HEV is found in the feces of an infected person. It is spread when someone inadvertently swallows the virus – even in microscopic amounts. In developing countries, people often contract the hepatitis E virus by drinking water contaminated with the feces of people infected.

In the United States and other developed countries where hepatitis E is not common, people have become ill with hepatitis E after eating raw or undercooked pork, venison, wild pork, or shellfish. In the past, most cases in developed countries involved people who have recently traveled to countries where hepatitis E is common.

Symptoms of hepatitis E can include fatigue, loss of appetite, abdominal pain, nausea, and jaundice. However, many people with hepatitis E, especially young children, have no symptoms. Except for the rare occurrence of chronic hepatitis E in people with compromised immune systems, most people make a full recovery from the disease without any complications. There is currently no vaccine available for hepatitis E in the United States.

World Hepatitis Day essay
World Hepatitis Day essay

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